‘Star Wars’ star, ‘Game of Thrones’ star on why we’re not ready to ‘win the war’

When it comes to the big screen, you can’t win the war on crime unless you win the hearts and minds of the people who watch it.

That’s exactly what George Lucas did with the original Star Wars, which set the template for the genre’s success to this day.

But while the movie is arguably one of the best of all time, its sequel, The Force Awakens, didn’t quite live up to expectations.

Now, the same cannot be said for The Force Unleashed, which opened with a bang, grossing over $400 million worldwide.

But that’s not to say it didn’t disappoint.

The Force is strong in the theater, and fans of both franchises can now go see both on their own time.

As the only major franchise to make a return to the screen, the stakes for the future of this genre are huge.

We spoke with director Joe Johnston about how he came up with the idea of a new Star Wars trilogy, how the Force has evolved over the years, and why he thinks The Force has won the war.

1.

What inspired you to take on this story?

When I was first approached to direct the sequel, I was thrilled that there was such a big fan base for the franchise and so many people who have enjoyed watching the films in their entirety.

I had an idea in my head of what I wanted to do, and when I was able to get to shoot the first film, I knew that it was something that was worthy of my time.

So I got on the phone and pitched it to a bunch of directors and they all loved it.

It was so cool to see how excited people were to see it.

So when I heard that I was going to be directing the second one, I had a feeling that it would be something that I wanted.

2.

How did you decide to go with the “no holds barred” approach to the original trilogy?

When you’re talking about the franchise’s first two films, there’s a lot of continuity and the characters all kind of seem to share a similar trajectory.

So it was important to me that I didn’t go down a completely different path with the third film.

In the original film, we had a lot more of that continuity, and we were able to expand a lot on the characters and explore a lot further.

That gave me a lot greater freedom to do what I thought was fun and interesting.

3.

What is it about the first trilogy that you’re particularly excited about?

I think it was great that the original three films were such a success.

They were all very well-written, very well acted, and they were very well made.

The fact that they all made such a huge amount of money in the first place was very exciting to me.

But the thing that really brought me back to it was the fact that it’s the only franchise that I’m in.

And so it was really rewarding to work with that.

What was the original idea behind the “No Holds Barred” approach?

We didn’t really have a plan for this.

It just kind of came about organically.

I always have this notion that, if I want to do a new film, it has to be a big, huge franchise.

I think that’s a really important concept for me to be able to make something that has a huge impact on the industry.

So, in the beginning, we were going to do it a little differently.

I wasn’t really sure exactly what that was going the first time around, and I felt like I had to get creative with it.

And I’m a big movie buff, so I wanted it to be really, really fun and crazy, and that was my goal from the beginning.

But we also had to make sure that it wouldn’t feel like it was taking place in a vacuum.

So that’s when we decided to go in a different direction.

The first movie was a lot darker, and there was a big push for darker humor in that.

So we had to figure out a way to do that and make sure it didn.

4.

How has the backlash to The Force Strikes Back affected your decision to direct The Force Unite?

Well, I think it’s really great that people have such an opinion about this.

I’m excited about it.

People really love it.

But it’s just really fun to make movies.

So for me, it’s kind of fun that I get to go back and try and do something different.

But at the same time, it kind of brings back memories.

And what I’ve learned about the movies is that they’re so fun and I really enjoy doing them, but they’re also so hard to make.

And to make it so difficult to make them is very, very frustrating.

5.

How would you describe the movie that you directed in The Force?

Well it’s a fun movie, and it’s one of those movies